Mass Media

Mass media, both traditional media, like TV and magazines, and “new” media, like Web sites, social networking sites, and text messaging, have enormous potential and power to influence individual behaviors and societal attitudes. Working alone, and in partnership with the other sectors, mass media have much to contribute through the following strategies:

STRATEGY 1
Encourage public health agencies to form partnerships with other agencies across the eight sectors to combine resources around common themes in promoting physical activity.

STRATEGY 2
Enact federal legislation to support a sustained physical activity mass media campaign.

STRATEGY 3
Develop consistent mass communication messages that promote physical activity, have a clear and standardized “brand,” and are consistent with the most current Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans.

STRATEGY 4
Ensure that messages and physical activity plans developed by state and local public health agencies and key stakeholders from the eight sectors are consistent with national messages.

STRATEGY 5
Sequence, plan, and provide campaign activities in a prospective, coordinated manner. Support and link campaign messages to community-level programs, policies, and environmental supports.

STRATEGY 6
Encourage mass media professionals to become informed about the importance of physical activity and the potential role they can play in promoting physical activity.

STRATEGY 7
Encourage local, state, and federal public health agencies and key stakeholders from the eight sectors to integrate into their physical activity plans and programs Web- and new media-based physical activity interventions that are supported by evidence.

STRATEGY 8
Expand the definition of media for mediated interventions to include new and emerging technologies such as global positioning systems, video gaming, and other technologies. Identify funding for research to develop evidence that supports or opposes the use of existing and emerging technologies for increasing physical activity.